Contamination of green waste can result in non-collection or the waste going to landfill

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News release: 18 October 2011
Contamination of green waste can result in non-collection or the waste going to landfill

The Hertfordshire Waste Partnership is reminding residents to take extra care with the waste they put in their green waste recycling bins.


Cllr Daniel Chichester-Miles, Portfolio Holder for Environmental said: “There’s a problem at the moment with the amount of plastics cropping up in composting loads. If this is spotted at the kerbside, your bin won’t be collected. If the contaminated waste makes it to a recycling facility, the whole load may be rejected and then has to be sent to landfill, which has both financial and environmental consequences.”

Contamination of green waste occurs when non-compostable items are placed in the green waste bin.

The following can be put into green waste bins:

• All food waste - including food scraps, peelings/bones (both raw & cooked), meat, fish, dairy, bread, fruit, vegetables, tea bags, coffee grounds and egg shells. This can be wrapped in newspaper.
• Compostable bags made from paper and carrying the symbol shown here.

Recycling symbol














• Garden waste - including grass / hedge cuttings, leaves, twigs, small branches (cut up), real Christmas trees (cut up), flowers / dead headings, potted plants (without the pots), woody prunings, weeds, straw / hay (including small animal bedding - anything organic that rots easily).
• Simple, natural cardboard - including  brown corrugated cardboard (no sellotape, parcel tape or adhesives), toilet roll / kitchen roll tubes, cereal packets, shredded paper, cardboard egg boxes (with non-compostable labels removed), tissues, paper towels, envelopes (without windows).

Contamination of green waste can result in non-collection or the waste going to landfill

The following contaminate the waste, resulting in non-collection or having to send the waste to landfill:

• All types of plastic. This includes plastic films,  black plastic refuse sacks, plastic supermarket carrier bags, plastic flower pots, polystyrene seedling trays and any ridged plastic (such as toys like lego).
• Laminated, waxed and foil lined cardboard packaging (for example ‘Tetra Paks’ - juice cartons or washing powder boxes).
• Textiles.
• Treated wood.
• Glossy Paper and Magazines.
• Glass.
• Metal.
• Ceramics and Hardcore.
• Soil.
• Carpets.
• Furniture.
• Duvets and pillows.
• Nappies.
• Fire ash
• Dead animals.
• Pet faeces.
• Hazardous wastes. This includes garden chemicals, asbestos etc.

Cllr Daniel Chichester-Miles, Portfolio Holder for Environmental continued: “Our residents have really taken to recycling green waste and it’s a shame that a few people putting the wrong waste in the wrong bins could undo everyone’s great work. Please take a moment to think about whether the right things are going in the right bins. And if in doubt, leave it out!”

Advice about recycling, collections and what can go in different bins is available on http://www.recyclingforapremier.com/green-waste-bin-bag. More advice on recycling is available on www.wasteaware.org.uk.

Member contact:
Cllr Daniel Chichester-Miles, Portfolio Holder for Environmental
St Albans City and District Council
Tel: 01582 766479 Mobile: 07701099503

Contact for the press:
Davina Mansell, Information and Communication Officer
Tel: 01727 819316. E-mail: davina.mansell@stalbans.gov.uk
St Albans City and District Council
www.stalbans.gov.uk
Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/StAlbansCouncil

Notes

Hertfordshire Waste Partnership
The Hertfordshire Waste Partnership (HWP) is a partnership between the county council and the ten district and borough councils. It was formed in 1992 to coordinate the waste management services provided by Hertfordshire’s councils.

The Hertfordshire Waste Partnership is committed to increasing the amount we recycle in Hertfordshire to at least 50% by 2012, but recycling is only part of the solution. If we reduce the amount of waste we generate in the first place and reuse more household items, we will dramatically lower the amount of waste that needs to be recycled or disposed of.

The 'four Rs' - Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Recover - are all critical in ensuring a sustainable, complete approach to waste management

For more information visit www.wasteaware.org.uk.